On The Blessed Routine of a Mom and Wife -E. Elliot

“The routines of housework and of mothering may be seen as a kind of death, and it is appropriate that they should be, for they offer a chance, day after day, to lay down one’s life for others. Then they are no longer routines.”

Elisabeth Elliot

On Not Resenting Our Place in the Story -N.D. Wilson-

“Do not resent your place in the story. Do not imagine yourself elsewhere. Do not close your eyes and picture a world without thorns, without shadows, without hawks. Change this world. Use your body like a tool meant to be used up, discarded, and replaced. Better every life you touch. We will reach the final chapter. When we have eyes that can stare into the sun, eyes that only squint for the Shenikah, then we will see laughing children pulling cobras by their tails, and hawks and rabbits playing tag.”
― N.D. Wilson, Notes from the Tilt-A-Whirl: Wide-Eyed Wonder in God’s Spoken World

On Learning to Pray -Elisabeth Elliot-

“Learning to pray is learning to trust the wisdom, the power, and the love of our Heavenly Father, always so far beyond our dreams. He knows our need and knows ways to meet it that have never been entered our heads. Things we feel sure we need for happiness may often lead to our ruin. Things we think will ruin us (the chariots of Egypt, the waters of the sea, or the little waves in Belmar!), if we believe what the Father tells us and surrender ourselves into His strong arms, bring us deliverance and joy.”

Elisabeth Elliot, Keep a Quiet Heart (p.33)

On Growing in Grace for the Sake of our Children -Douglas Jones-

“Children are a means of sanctification because they are daily adopting their parents’ character, virtues and vices and all. This is a blessing when we are faithful, but it’s a frightening mirror when we see our own sins growing in them. With kids around, we can’t just move slowly on our own growth. We have to grow in grace for the sake of the kids. If we don’t, then we become a curse to them and their children.”

Douglas Jones, Angels in the Architecture (p.124)